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GO WELL FIRST TASTES

BUTTERNUT SQUASH

14BSQUASH01-1_FIRST_TASTES_BUTTERNUT_SQUASH-1

IDEAL AGE

  • Start between 4-6 months

FLAVOR PROFILE

  • GW_SWEET_ICON_PLANT Sweet

TO SERVE

  • Shake and squeeze the desired amount into a clean bowl and always serve warm with a clean spoon.

TIPS & TRICKS

14BSQUASH01-1_FIRST_TASTES_BUTTERNUT_SQUASH

Nutritional Information

Butternut squash*, water. *ORGANIC

Heating Instructions:

Simply stand the bowl of food in a container of hot water for one to two minutes. DO NOT MICROWAVE POUCH. AN ADULT SHOULD ALWAYS CHECK THE FOOD TEMPERATURE BEFORE SERVING TO BABY.

Warning Choking Hazard: Keep cap out of the reach of infants and children. Always keep refrigerated and use within 2 days after opening. Do not re- use or store heated food. Do not use this product if the pouch appears unusually inflated, damaged or tamper-evident seal is broken.

REFER A FRIEND

Nutritional Benefits of Butternut Squash

Butternut squash has a veggie sweet flavor profile while providing a great source of dietary fibre for digestive health and balancing blood glucose levels. It provides a good source of vitamin A and Beta-Carotene for healthy eye sight and has great anti-oxidant properties.

0% sugar

No added fruit

real flavors

No Artificial Ingredients

organic

5 Star Ingredients Sourced

nutrient dense

Real produce only

100% pure

No Artificial Ingredients or Preservatives used.

A taste of Flavor Training

Flavor Training is at the heart of Good Feeding and the Go Well program. Science shows that it is possible to ‘train’ a preference for vegetables within the first few months of exposure to food. Flavor Training, not to be confused with complementary feeding, begins before baby needs nutrition beyond breast-milk or formula. It uses a ‘window of opportunity’ between 4 and 7 months, when baby is more receptive to trying new things for exposure and exploration without any stress associated with feeding.

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A taste of what you'll discover in our knowledge center

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Where did we get this idea that using baby-led weaning (BLW) or puree feeding has to be all-or-nothing?  
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As parents, we all want to do what's best for our babies, infants, and children. So, it can be more than a little concerning with the news that our family's youngest members could be at risk from the very thing meant to nurture us all – food. How do we be sure that what we are putting in baby's mouth isn't doing more harm than good?  
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Important News for Babies Approaching 4 months old

4 months of age signals the start of an exciting window of opportunity, that if taken advantage of has the ability to not only transform your parenting journey (and family mealtimes) going forward, but more importantly, your child’s health and wellness potentials for life. 4 months marks the important opportunity to start ‘Flavour Training’!  
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Complementary Feeding vs. Flavor Training

By Diana K Rice, Nutrition, LLC, RD, LD, CLEC In the medical community, there's a clear consensus on when infants should begin complementary feeding: at 6 months old. But despite the AAP, ACOG, AAFP and WHO recommendations being very clear about this timeline, parents often start much earlier. The primary reason that official guidelines push for this 6 month mark is that very early introduction of complementary foods has been shown to reduce breastfeeding's overall duration. The medical community also holds concerns that introducing solids prior to the age of 6 months could increase the risk of choking and aspiration, lead to diarrhea and poor gut health and contribute to the onset of certain chronic diseases later in life, including diabetes and celiac disease. So why is there so much confusion over this?
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